Methods of Identifying Training Needs

//Methods of Identifying Training Needs

training needs

Continuous training and development is important as it helps the business keep up with the emerging customer needs as well as technologies in the industry. There are many areas which you may train your staff, but some may not add value to your business. Below are methods you can use to determine which the training needs of your team.

Observing your team

Managers can observe the performance of their teams over a period to determine what skills may be lacking. The observation could include workmanship, the speed of task completion, and how well they collaborate on projects. Their ability to solve problems that come up along the way can also be an invaluable asset.

Discussions with the team members

It is a good practice to sit down with team members and identify problems that they are facing when executing their duties. Managers can ask for suggestions of areas that the workers feel they need the training or coaching to boost their skills and performance. This does not need to wait until the company does the performance appraisals. Individual or team discussions can be initiated proactively.

Introduction of new technology or equipment to the business

If you are changing the way work is done, you need to train the affected teams on the new working methods. The areas that may require training may include operations automation, the introduction of a new system or equipment, change of company culture or business structure. The training helps enhance competency in the new methods of working.

Recognition of prior learning

This process involves scrutinizing the existing knowledge and skills through available evidence such as certificates, accreditations or practical demonstrations. These skills are then compared with the required standards either in the industry or by the company.

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The company can identify the skills that may be lacking or not up to standard using this method. The method may also be used to select members who may be trained on a different area in which the company has interest.

Performance appraisals

Most companies perform performance appraisals at the end of the year. Part of the appraisal process should be the evaluation of individual skills against the position he or she holds in the company. You can determine whether additional training can help improve performance in the coming year. This session is also good for the individual workers to speak out of any skills that they feel lacking.

Self-evaluation

You should encourage the workers to self-evaluate their performance and come up with a list of areas of opportunity. This approach helps the workers to be pro-active in improving their skills. The approach also motivates the members to improve their performance. However, you have to foster open communication and promote the ‘open door’ policy to encourage the workers to speak up.

Job descriptions

Each of the positions has detailed job requirements and desired skills along with duties to be performed. The qualifications set in the job description can be used to identify areas individuals require coaching  compared to the duties that the position holds. Job descriptions should also be evaluated from time to time to identify any gaps that may occur between required performance and required skills.

Periodic team training and development can give your firm some competitive advantage over the competition. And it can improve customer experience, while lowering operating costs. Use the tips above to determine skills that are lacking in the organization.

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2018-05-01T02:09:54+00:00 April 25th, 2018|

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  • Post Title: Methods of Identifying Training Needs
  • Post URL: https://www.timeclockwizard.com/2712-2
  • Page ID: 2712